News within the industry of pulp and paper, Jul, 23 2019
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Södra invests SEK 8.8 million in R&D projects  

Photo: Södra
Photo: Södra
Published by
Simon Matthis - 02 Jul 2019

The Södra Research Foundation has decided to grant an additional SEK 8.8 million to 12 research projects linked to forestry and the forest industry.

The funding was awarded to projects including process development in the pulp industry, recycling textiles and controlling pulpwood flows.

 

“The linear life cycle for textiles needs to become circular, but the lack of recycling technologies is a major problem. One of the projects that has received funding will further develop a process to recycle mixed textiles that is compatible with today’s Swedish forest industry, which will be of interest to both our industry and the textile industry,” said Catrin Gustavsson, Senior Vice President Innovation and New Business at Södra.

 

Several forest-related projects were awarded funding, for example studying genetic gains, Douglas fir, damage to pine and better swarming forecasts for spruce bark beetles.

 

“There is a desire to increase the share of pine in young forests, not least given climate change.  However, we can see increasing problems with disturbance of growth in regeneration stands of pine, which is causing concern about the initiative. The Foundation’s funding for a research project that aims to clarify the cause-effect relationship will hopefully guide us in how we can address these problems,” said Göran Örlander, Forestry Strategist and Chairman of the Research Foundation.

 

In conjunction with this autumn’s call for proposals, research into the “efficient utilisation of resources” in the forest industry is particularly welcomed. The call for proposals concerns both core forest industry products and by-products. 

 

“The efficient use of wood raw material, by-products from harvesting, energy, water and chemicals keeps costs down and improves profitability. At the same time, it also benefits society, businesses and individuals by minimising environmental and climate-change impacts,” said Göran Örlander.