News within the industry of pulp and paper, Dec, 14 2018
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Forestry with different aging forests more common in Finland

During the period January to May 2018, the proportion of picking and hatching increased to 3.7 percent of all planned fires, reports the Finnish Forest Center. Photo: Creative Commons, credit: 12019
During the period January to May 2018, the proportion of picking and hatching increased to 3.7 percent of all planned fires, reports the Finnish Forest Center. Photo: Creative Commons, credit: 12019
Published by
Markku Björkman - 19 Jun 2018

One reason why the traditional crops still dominate in Finland and elsewhere is that the forests have been managed through thinning and finishing mills for decades and that they have therefore developed into the right-bodied stocks.

Forestry of tree populations of different ages is becoming more common in the privately owned forests, the Helsinki newspaper Hufvudstadsbladet, HBL writes.

The harvesting methods in so-called unusual forests are picking and hatching. By picking up, you remove the largest trees, so that you get light and space for a natural plant lookup. When shedding, small glands are made, where there are natural plants, explains HBL.

During the period January to May this year, the proportion of picking and hatching increased to 3.7 percent of all planned fires, reports the Finnish Forest Center. Last year, picking and hatching were planned at 1.6 percent of the entire harvesting area or just over 11 000 hectares, according to the notifications submitted to the Forest Center.

The increase is mainly attributable to the felling following the extensive snow in Kajanaland, North Karelia, and Northern Savolax. However, in most of the country's private forests, traditional fires and finishings are still taking place.

"Forestry with different aging forests will become more common in the future, as forest owners often also have goals for their forest other than purely economic values," said Markku Remes, leading forestry expert at the Finnish Forest Center.

He refers to PTT's economic research institute data that 14 percent of the woods' wood volume is owned by people who do not want the hedgehog in their forests.

Those who work in the forestry industry, according to PTT, are advised to recommend picking and hatching because the renewal can be slow. In southern Finland, the possibilities for uncooked forestry are also limited by the rotted root spreading to the undergrowth via the root system of the trees.